All our French Bulldogs are registered with the American Kennel Club and come with registration papers.

History

There is a difference of opinion as to the origin of the French Bulldog, but one ancestor must have been the English Bulldog – probably one of the toy variety, of which there were a great number in England around 1860.

These toy Bulldogs were sent in large numbers into France, where they were crossed with various other breeds and were given the name Boule-Dog Francais.

One found dogs with rose ears, while others had bat ears which is now an outstanding feature of the French Bulldog.

Another distinctive feature of the French Bulldog is the skull. The correctly formed skull should be level, or flat, between the ears, while directly above the eyes, extending almost across the forehead, it should be slightly curve, giving a domed appearance.

In the early days of breeding in Europe, the tendency was toward the rose ear. This movement was opposed by Americans and the breed would eventually lost the feature that strongly accentuates its individuality, and the result would have been practically a miniature English Bulldog.

This controversy over type was responsible for the formation of the French Bulldog Club of America, the first organization in the world devoted to the breed.

In 1898 fanciers gave a specialty show in the ballroom of the Waldorf-Astoria . The affair proved a sensation, and it was due, no doubt, to the resulting publicity that the quaint little chaps became the rage in society.

French Bulldog Temperment

Despite his glum expression, the French Bulldog is comical, entertaining, and dependably amiable.

As comfortable in an apartment as he is on a farm, he is more lively than you might suspect from his chunky appearance.

French Bulldog puppies are especially frisky, and ball chasing is one of their passions.

Adults are more dignified and can be champion couch potatoes, but also love to clown around and go for walks in cool weather.

Many Frenchies are friendly with everyone, while others are politely reserved. French Bulldogs will bark to announce visitors, but are otherwise quiet dogs.

Usually peaceful with other pets (though some French Bulldogs will hunt small rodents), males may bicker with other males.

The French Bulldog is quite stubborn and can be challenging to train, yet also surprisingly sensitive, remembers what he learns, and responds well to early, patient, persistent training that utilizes food motivation.

By starting training early you will ensure a happy life for both you and your Frenchy!